laurbits

I'm a comic artist w/ a love for excellent stories in the form of movies, TV shows, musicals, manga, and animation.

This is my virtual scrapbook and reblog tumblr. Bits and pieces of the internet and the occasional ramble about stuff I love.

[Polterguys Comic blog] [Art blog] [Fandom blog]

Other places to find me:
website
deviantart
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FAVORITE TAGS:
Advice / Resources / Animation / Writing / Life

Recent Tweets @laurbits

diaemyung:

Have a great day

(via burdge)

mortten:

lettuce umbrella

mortten:

lettuce umbrella

(via felaxx)

If we can’t write diversity into sci-fi, then what’s the point? You don’t create new worlds to give them all the same limits of the old ones.

Ever finished a book? I mean, truly finished one? Cover to cover. Closed the spine with that slow awakening that comes with reentering consciousness?

You take a breath, deep from the bottom of your lungs and sit there. Book in both hands, your head staring down at the cover, back page or wall in front of you.

You’re grateful, thoughtful, pensive. You feel like a piece of you was just gained and lost. You’ve just experienced something deep, something intimate… Full from the experience, the connection, the richness that comes after digesting another soul.

[…]

It’s no surprise that readers are better people. Having experienced someone else’s life through abstract eyes, they’ve learned what it’s like to leave their bodies and see the world through other frames of reference. They have access to hundreds of souls, and the collected wisdom of all them.

Beautiful read on why readers are, “scientifically,” the best people to date

Perhaps Kafka’s timeless contention that books are "the axe for the frozen sea inside us" applies equally to the frozen sea between us. 

(via explore-blog)

neil will love this one.

(via amandapalmer)

(via felaxx)

fayren:

I get a lot of questions about my process so I thought it’d be cool to break down and talk about some of my steps for illustrating covers! I hope this is helpful or interesting, it’s not quite a tutorial but perhaps it’s a glimpse into my thought process.

Step 1 | Thumbnail. The point here is to do several very fast, small, drawings, so you can’t get hung up on details. Here I’m thinking most about composition and subject. I had four originally and this one was picked to get finished.

Step 2 | Sketch. I draw on top of my thumbnail, nailing down more of the actual details. I fix any proportion isssues but I still try not to waste too much time making final lines, the sketch will go away in the end, so it just needs to be good enough for me. 

Step 3 | Background Painting. A lot of lightning and mood is set by the environment, so I start with determining their background. I browse through lots of inspirational paintings and photographs during this stage, and try to get a palette in my head for the overall piece. I use the lasso tool to fill in their silhouettes with black and lock the layer transparency. The silhouette is very important for readability, so I make sure even without colors the shapes are distinct.

Step 4 | Rough Color Blocking. I block in base colors and basic lighting under the sketch layer, blocking in the different materials and colors. 

Step 5 | The Fun Part. Here’s where I just get to zone out and paint. I flatten the sketch onto the color blocked layer (if you’re nervous, you can always duplicate these layers and tuck them into another folder before you flatten and commit) and finally get to painting. The sketch eventually gets entirely painted over. Things I’m thinking about during this stage: different materials, changes in planes, drawing from the background colors. 

Stage 6 | Details. I use the lasso tool and fill to do very tiny details like scratches, small specular highlights, etc. I add some wear and tear and knock out a bit of Fulcrum’s teeth. (huhuhu)

Stage 7 | MOAR BLOOD. At this point I decided there wasn’t enough energon dripping off of Tarn and I added more on a new layer. Again, grabbing areas with the lasso tool, filling, and erasing parts of it to make it appear transparent. 

Stage 8 | Lighting Effects. I add some soft glows to Tarn’s lights, but keep his forehead light the brightest. I want it to be the main source of light in the scene so I don’t want to distract. Light is bouncing through the pink energon, so I made the light falling on Tarn’s face more pink. 

Stage 9 | Final Lights. I add a harsh white rim light to both of the figures, really pulling them away from the background to finalize the painting. 

joy-ang:

I’ve had éclairs on my mind. #FoodStudy

berlynn-wohl:

mashmoments:

Alan Alda talking about misogyny and nailing it

This man — who is the most wonderful amazing human being on the planet, by the way — skirted very close to dropping some serious fucking knowledge in this video, and I don’t know why he didn’t do it, but I’m going to:

In 1943, when he was seven years old, Alan Alda contracted polio. At the time, the standard treatment for the disease was to immobilize one’s limbs by strapping them to planks, to prevent muscle contractions and deformity. The splints had the unfortunate side effect, however, of causing muscle atrophy due to lack of use. So Alan’s parents instead decided to subject him to a new (and admittedly painful) treatment that had been developed by a nurse named Sister Elizabeth Kenny: extremely hot woolen blankets applied to the limbs, accompanied by a regiment of muscle-stretching.

Sister Elizabeth’s treatment was basically the exact opposite of what the medical establishment (all men at the time, obvs) recommended. And that establishment — when they acknowledged her technique at all — referred to it as a “grievous error and fraught with grave danger.”

But those doctors who were skeptical of her technique had their minds changed when they actually deigned to observe the results in patients. Wow, that’s so odd: it’s almost as if they discounted Sister Kenny’s methods without knowing anything about them save that the person who developed them was a woman. Hmm.

Alan Alda attributes not only his full recovery from polio to her treatment, but also his being a feminist — because, as he mentioned in the video, a deadly disease that he contracted was successfully combated because men and women were working to fight it.

(via tildrum)

ananthymous:

rvsa:

surfin’ birds

wowww