laurbits

I'm a comic artist w/ a love for excellent stories in the form of movies, TV shows, musicals, manga, and animation.

This is my virtual scrapbook and reblog tumblr. Bits and pieces of the internet and the occasional ramble about stuff I love.

[Polterguys Comic blog] [Art blog] [Fandom blog]

Other places to find me:
website
deviantart
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FAVORITE TAGS:
Advice / Resources / Animation / Writing / Life

Recent Tweets @laurbits

ericscissorhands:

"Some women are lost in the fire. Some women are built from it."

(via tildrum)

thelittlestbat:

our hoodies - batgirl (babs tarr/cameron stewart design)

something i REALLY wanted us to get done before our US trip and thus couldn’t get out of my head till now TuT i know i want to give it a remake but i think it’s not that bad for a first try! ♥ obviously based on babs tarr and cameron stewart's new batgirl design :3 i even forced kairi to be a model again heheh~ I’M SO SORRY for so many photos but i really love all the tiny details and couldn’t decide on what to include ORZ

p-alindrome:

let me just say a few things about ‘all about that bass’ real quick

  1. it’s a song about body positivity and we don’t get many of those so can we just take that into consideration please
  2. i know people are kicking off about her using the phrase “skinny bitches” but she does follow it up with "no, i’m just playing i know you think you’re fat / but i’m here to tell you that / every inch of you is perfect from the bottom to the top"  she’s taken an insult commonly given to slim women and basically a said so what if you are skinny/skinny but you think you’re fat, YOU’RE STILL PERFECT 
  3. i’ve seen shit loads of people saying it makes them feel more confident, and slim women get a ton of media reinforcing the idea that their body is perfect anyway
  4. IT’S CATCHY AS FUCK 

(via ajamoore)

tamorapierce:

evelywin:

captoring:

nombinary:

guy:

THE REACTION FACES ARE WHAT I LIVE FOR

But how DO vampires go sailing??!?

… they use a blood vessel?

platypusinplaid

Skeleton puns.

Not on Monday morning.

Please?

Too late.

You’re killing me, here.

(via meowmixeightysix)

icatler:

icatsgrotto:

Josie and the Pussycats in “Musical Evolution” x

Coolest promo ever created

Real talk though, this is one of the coolest tributes to a classic cartoon with the most interesting animation in it I’ve ever seen, look how wonderful it is.

GO.

WATCH.

THE VIDEO.

(via fuckyeah2danimation)

maxink:

Don’t Wait.”

Matt Slaybaugh is a theatre geek, a comics nerd and the creative director of Available Light Theatre.  He’s also an inspiring public speaker. (And he wrote the introduction to my first Blink graphic novel, So Far. Which is fair, since I’ve done a couple of things for him.) 

I’ve known Matt for just over a decade and he’s been teaching me ever since. Either through what he says to me directly, or what he does himself creatively; I’m always learning from Matt. 

chirart:

Once I was sitting at a convention table promoting That Which Wills, the first story of which being outright gay erotica. Sometimes when guys pick it up they either put it down straightaway like their hands have been burned, or act like they’re holding a baby upside down. Then up comes the biggest dudebro to ever dudebro with his dudebro friend, and my expectations were very low when they picked up the book.

"Oh, hello!" He starts laughing when he turns to one of the sexier pages. "They look like they’re having fun." And proceeds to keep reading.

His friend rolls his eyes and comments he didn’t know mr dudebro was into that sort of thing, to which dudebro snorts back. “Why do I have to be into anything? Gay people exist in real life so it makes fucking sense they should exist in stories, dude?”

He ended up reading half of the book, chatted happily with me about the characters, bought it, shook my hand, and went on his merry way.

It’s something I remember from time to time because it’s an example of how uncomplicated it should really be.

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

(via pixelreblags)

When you first got into comics, did you feel like you were better at, or more interested in, the drawing or the writing? I want to make my own comics, but I feel like my art straggles behind my writing. How can I cause these two aspects of comic-making to come together within myself, and make the works I want to make?
laurbits laurbits Said:

scarygoround:

faitherinhicks:

Oh hey, this is something I think a lot about, actually! So when I started making comics (15 years ago this month, haha), I was really terrible at drawing. And I wanted to do, y’know, GRAPHIC NOVELS, with fairly realistically drawn characters and backgrounds and things that are hard to draw. Things that I didn’t really have the skills to draw at the time. So I’d draw my comics and the art was generally pretty terrible. But I was comfortable with writing, and that helped me keep going with making comics, because I enjoyed the storytelling aspect of them so much. 

It’s hard when you feel pretty okay about your writing but your art doesn’t measure up. I kind of feel like my art still doesn’t measure up to what I want it to be (mostly right now I want it to be Hiromu Arakawa, which will never happen, no matter how much I practice), but I’m very comfortable with the writing part of comics, so I look at that as my great strength in my work. It makes up for where my art is lacking, and I work hard at writing to make the sum total of my work better than if I was just writing or just drawing.

I mean, the absolute best thing about comics (to me) is that you don’t need to be a spectacular artist to make really great, involving comics. I’m not an amazing technical artist. During my down times, I don’t draw gorgeous illustrations or do amazing paintings (I kind of dislike doing that kind of thing, to be honest). I will never be Gillian Tamaki. But I’m good at storytelling, and I’m good at interpreting emotion and drawing that on the comic page. So I work to my strengths, which is making stories about engaging characters, and laying out scenes where there is a lot of emotion running through them, and people who like my comics don’t seem to mind that my art is not as great as Gillian Tamaki or Hiromu Arakawa.

Comics aren’t just art or just writing, they’re the two combined to make something new and wonderful. They are more than the sum of their parts. So work hard to because a decent artist with a good grasp of storytelling basics (this is super important!), and work harder to become a truly excellent writer and storyteller, and you can quite possibly make great comics! It worked for me. :)

This describes my experience almost exactly.